5.06.2017

Book Review: Spork


Both is good. (4 stars)


Growing up I had family members and friends who were bi-racial or multi-racial. It wasn't something we really talked about much and I don't remember ever reading a book that really addressed it for kids. Knowing how much stories helped me with the things that made me feel different in a bad way I was eager to see what SPORK would bring to the table (no pun intended).

The illustrations are cute and the concept is a lot of fun. I think SPORK will be very relatable not just to kids who are biracial but any who have very different sides of their family.

Notes: Review copy received via NetGalley.


Spork by Kyo Maclear & Isabelle Arsenault 

Children's, Family, Self Esteem, Multicultural
Digital/Print (34 pages, KIDS CAN PRESS)
His mum is a spoon. His dad is a fork. And he's a bit of both. He's Spork! Spork sticks out in the regimented world of the cutlery drawer. The spoons think he's too pointy, while the forks find him too round. He never gets chosen to be at the table at mealtimes until one day a very messy ... thing arrives in the kitchen who has never heard of cutlery customs. Will Spork finally find his place at the table? This “multi-cutlery” tale is a humorous and lively commentary on individuality and tolerance. Its high-spirited illustrations capture the experience and emotions of anyone who has ever wondered about their place in the world.



5.05.2017

Review: Zombies: A Brief History Of Decay

A new favorite! (5 stars)

It's been a while since I sat down and devoured anything zombie related. While I can't say I'm the type of fan who reads or watches all things zombies, I am ever interested in finding fresh takes on the genre. At first I didn't think ZOMBIES: A BRIEF HISTORY was going to be particularly unique, there's only so much one can do with an apocalyptic scenario after all. Somehow, it managed to maintain a steady story pace and develop some new (or at least, new to me) ideas and really tell a good story. I was particularly pleased to see the Pacific Northwest as a key setting for a lot of the story, Peru really used it well.

While some elements are certainly old hat I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I couldn't put it down and actually read it from cover to cover in one sitting. If you're a fan of TWD or just love an engrossing graphic novel I would much recommend it.

Notes: Review copy received via NetGalley.

Zombies: A Brief History Of Decay by Olivier Peru, Sophian Cholet, & Simon Champelovier 


Graphic Novel, Horror, Zombies
Print (152 pages, INSIGHT)
A vivid and richly illustrated graphic novel, Zombies offers an action-packed tour through an apocalyptic vision of America.
Mankind is no longer at the top of the food chain. Zombies have taken their place, and nothing can stop them. Is this the end of humanity? Perhaps, but for some it is only the beginning.
Six billion living corpses are all that remains of civilization. Among the few survivors is Sam Coleman, a man who owes his salvation to Smith & Wesson and a little luck. Fleeing Seattle at the onset of the zombie outbreak, he was forced to leave his daughter behind. Yet now that silence has fallen over the city, he believes that she may still be alive. And his conscience serves up a constant reminder that to be human in this grim world is to have hope—and to keep fighting.





Review: The Fireside Grown-Up Guide to the Mom


It's not all wine and diapers. (4 stars)

If you enjoy a good parody book that pokes fun at parenting you're sure to enjoy this one. It's a little painful because it's weirdly spot on at times, though other times I found myself raising my brow at the questionable wording. This could make a cute gift for a new mom with a good sense of humor or a terrible gift for your own mother, gift at your own risk.

Notes: Review copy received via NetGalley.

The Fireside Grown-Up Guide to the Mom by Jason Hazeley and Joel Morris

Humor, Parenting, Parody
Digital/Print (64 pages, TOUCHSTONE)
Have you been having trouble with the How, Why, and Wheres? Well fear no more. The Fireside Grown-Up Guide series understands that the world is just as confusing to a forty-year-old as it is to a four-year-old. We’re here to help and break down the most pressing and complex issues of our day into easy-to-digest pieces of information paired with vivid illustrations even a child could understand.
A mom has two very important jobs: to look after her children and to do everything else well. In this Fireside Grown-Up Guide to Mom, we learn about what moms like (making toys out of corks from her many, many wine bottles), what she hates (the sound of her own voice, which now sounds just like her mom’s), what she’s really thinking about when she leaves her children with a babysitter (whether or not the babysitter can handle these little monsters), and many other enlightening facts.





Book Review: Moto and Me

Young readers will go wild for Moto. (5 stars)

I'm always on the lookout for non-fiction books about animals to share with the students in the 2nd grade classroom where I work. They are voracious readers in general but they seem to especially enjoy reading about animals, rescues in particular. I wish I'd received a print review copy just so I could have shared this one with them, without a doubt this would be a favorite. Moto is so cute and his story shows how important it is for baby animals to be with their mothers. I also found it to be an exciting way to learn how much work caring for an animal is as well as what happens when a wild animal is rehabilitated and able to return to their natural life cycle.

With lovely photographs and fascinating facts I think this would be great for children in the 2nd-4th grade levels. Even as an adult I enjoyed it.

Notes: Review copy received through NetGalley.


Moto and Me: My Year as a Wildcat's Foster Mom by Suzi Eszterhas


Animals, Africa, Nature
Print (40 pages, OWLKIDS)
Moto and Me tells the remarkable firsthand story of wildlife photographer Suzi Eszterhas’s care for an orphaned baby serval—a small, spotted wildcat—in Kenya. When a grass fire separates the serval from his family, a ranger asks Suzi, who is living in a bush camp and is skilled with animals, to be the serval’s foster mom.
The book chronicles Suzi’s tender care of Moto, including how she feeds, bathes, and plays with him, and helps him develop hunting skills. Her goal is to help him learn how to survive on his own in the wild. After 6 months, he is ready to leave—a difficult good-bye, but exactly what Suzi had worked for. Stunning photography illustrates this touching and rare wildlife rescue story.

LEVELING
Grade Range: 2–6
Fountas & Pinnell: P
Lexile: 860L
COMMON CORE
W.3.1,2,2a,2b,4,7,8,10
L.3.3,4,4a,4b,4c,4d,5,5b,5c,6
SL.3.1,1a,1c,1d,2,3,4,6
RF.3.3,3a,3b,3c,3d,4,4a,4c
RI.3.1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10



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